Declarations


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S3 Ep. 5: What Can Maps, Twitter, and the Crowd do for Human Rights?

In this episode we will be talking about the use of mapping and social media technologies to conduct human rights work, both outside the field and inside the field (what has come to be known as “Open Source Intelligence” or OSINT). 
This kind of work increasingly supports how human rights workers know with certainty when something has happened, and is becoming an important part of denouncing and reacting to human rights abuses. We were joined by Sam Dubberley, Senior Advisor to the Crisis Response Team at Amnesty International, and Manager of the Digital Verification Corps.

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S3 Ep. 4: A Right to Sleep: Homelessness and Temporary Housing

The documentary“Cities of Sleep” explores the world of insurgent sleeper communities, as well as the infamous ‘sleep mafia’ in Delhi. Filmmaker Shaunak Sen and Cambridge PhD candidate Shreyashi Dasgupta join us to discuss the intersection between urban development, changing societies, city life and communities experiencing homelessness.

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S3 Ep. 3: Lost in Europe: Missing Migrant Children

Over 10,000 migrant children have been lost after arriving in Europe. Where do they end up? What are their stories? And who is responsible for their increasing vulnerability and their being forgotten?

Our guests are Cecilia Ferrara and Ismael Einashe, investigative journalists from Lost in Europe: an investigative network committed to recovering the stories of these missing children.

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S3 Ep. 2: Bolsonaro and #NotHim: Something Old or Something New?

Everyone’s asking, “How did he win? What does this mean for Brazil’s future?” But Jair Bolsonaro’s victory in the October presidential election also raises more systemic questions.

Our guest, Dr Malu Gatto from the University of Zurich, joins us to explore the legacy of Brazil’s not-so-dated dictatorship for Bolsonaro and for resistance movements like #NotHim.

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Is Human Rights a Fable? (with Professor Samuel Moyn)

Is Human Rights just a fable?

To uncover this question, we venture down ‘history’ lane with Professor Samuel Moyn. What’s so special about the 1970s, and how does how we think about the emergence of human rights impact how we think of what human rights are, and what they are supposed to do? Join us and find out on this episode of Declarations.

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Can Human Rights Solve the Palestinian Question? (With Dr Ruba Salih & Odette Murray)

In this episode, we talk about occupation, refugee rights, and the status of Palestine.

Are there systematic ways to remedy human rights abuses against an occupied people? How has human rights language been used to facilitate occupation? What can be done? We were joined by Dr Ruba Salih (SOAS), expert on Transnational Migration and Gender, and Odette Murray, who is a lecturer in Law.

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Are Human Rights Always “Good”? Or Are They Weaponized? (with Chase Madar)

In this episode, we discuss the weaponisation of human rights, i.e. are human rights always “good”; or are they at times used for more sinister ends?

How has the use of human rights changed from the days in which they paved the way for movements around the globe, from the civil rights movement to the struggle to end apartheid, till today? Helping us delve into these murky waters, we were joined by Journalist, retired Civil Rights Lawyer, and Author of ‘The Passion of Chelsea Manning’, Chase Madar.

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Pussy Riot: Can Art Topple Tyrants? (with Pussy Riot’s Maria Alyokhina)

“If you are doing political art, you can say goodbye to safety. Art is not about safety.”

Pussy Riot activist Maria Alyokhina discusses how she’s used art to protest against authoritarianism in Russia, for which she spent nearly two years in prison. In this episode, she speaks out against the human rights abuses against LGBT citizens in Chechnya.

After Scott’s interview with Maria, former Moscow Times reporter Joanna Kozlowska and regular panelist Max Curtis explore the history of Russian feminist protests, from 1917 to today.